Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream David Platt | EBOOK

David Platt

Radical for the Wrong Reasons

"Taking Back your Faith from the American Dream." This is the confessed purpose of David Platt's new book, Radical. In it, he attempts to save American Christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the American Dream and Jesus Christ. A decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to Christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

Summary

His thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in Matthew 28 and a select few sayings of Jesus from the Gospels. Simply put, he asserts that the Great Commission is directed towards every, individual Christian; therefore, every Christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. The rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. For, he argues, God's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. Therefore, it should be ours.

He concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. This includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking God to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the Bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

Review

First, Platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of American Evangelicalism. He makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. All of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. Second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. While, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. Third, his zeal for Christ and for his people is humbling. While I believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. Fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. He does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. Lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in God but to demonstrate their reliance upon the Spirit through prayer and trust. He astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the Spirit in humility. In all these areas, Platt shines.

Even with these hard-hitting points, I cannot recommend this book. From a literary standpoint, it is messy. Topics do not flow well or build upon each other. It is monotonously anecdotal (I kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though I did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. However, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. If a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. Unfortunately, Radical exhibits neither. It is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

First, I believe Platt fundamentally misinterprets the Great Commission. The last command of Christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. As the rest of the New Testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. The church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as God’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. What Platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual Christians. A careful look at the Pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. Instead, Paul primarily leaves this to Timothy and Titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. For the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of Christ. Paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. They are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of God in a dying world. They are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. Nowhere do we see Paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. Paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching Christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. In doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. The making of disciples is for the community of God led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every Christian.

Second, his use of Scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. He takes almost every word of Jesus as being directly spoken to every Christian. He does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. At one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. Has he really read the New Testament? The impetus for most of Paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! Of the Galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! Granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the New Testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. The most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the Spirit. He quotes Jesus' statement about receiving the Spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. He gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the Spirit had yet to be given when Jesus states this. Thus, rather than understanding that the Spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the Spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the Spirit will come reside in us. This is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the Spirit in the church.

Third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. Instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. I believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the Commission to every Christian. Not every Christian baptized and not every Christian is gifted to teach all that Jesus commanded. So he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. Because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? Thus, he ends up marginalizing the Commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the Church.

Fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the New Testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. In fact, he never even mentions it in the book. We are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. This is a glaring absence in the book.

Lastly, he states that unless every Christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of God. Let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching Sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of God. This is rather short sided. God gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. That is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! We need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill God's purpose for his people.

In all, the cultural critique of Platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of Scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. In fact, it lays a burden upon the Christian that God himself has not given. His clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the New Testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. In my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making Radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. It has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of Christ. I fear many faithful Christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. By over-generalizing and being reductionistic, Platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. The glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. This is a tragedy.

230

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"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
how to publish to a topic, and how to consume from a topic in apache kafka. They come in an array of beam angles and are common in floodlights and radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
spotlights. Upstairs is an open air mezzanine level with a second sitting room, leading to another two large 230 family bedrooms one accommodating a third single bed, the other accommodating a cot. Reply to anyone's test radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
message any message containing "test" in it. Its unbeatable and 230 very nice bike everyone's favourite is pulsar f since till now pulsar f having a dashing and aggressive look in comparison to other bikes. The method of claim 16, further comprising: for each power radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
supply architecture, determining additional parts to implement a the supply sequence and generating the at least one power supply design to include the additional parts to implement the supply sequence. One of the reasons that capricorns are radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
so good at business besides being hardworkers is that they get things done in a timely manner. Coate, and joseph nolan, donated access land to preserved land at the edge of the millpond 230 which created a park. Religion and philosophy titles constitute radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
the majority of the collection, but periodicals dealing with other areas of the curriculum may also be found. Valued image this image has been assessed under the valued image criteria and is considered the most valued image on commons within the scope: saint peter's basilica vatican city, the radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
baldachin and the apse. Pubmed: simulation study 230 on the effect of salinity on the adsorption behavior of mercury in wastewater-irrigated area. Set in a beautifully restored villa in frogner, sawan combines the finest ingredients and delicate thai flavours to create a uniquely modern version of thai cuisine. 230 Yes, the driving distance between radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
crystal palace to esher is 16 miles.

Before radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
starting the appliance, follow the installation instructions see installation. Some of the softkeys are dependent on specific conditions for functions. Slight downside is parking but we radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
only had to walk for 5 minutes from a car park. Its job was also to recruit and train the next generation of stasi staff. This petition was granted in the late 19th century by spain, thereby creating the pueblo region of asturias. It's a tale about an unnamed protagonist who is forced to seek refuge in a flop house motel. Some 230 of these terms, specially "carbohydrate" and "sugar", are also used with other meanings. Irqbalance is the linux utility radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
tasked with making sure that interrupts from your hardware devices are handled in as efficient a manner as possible. The model was manufactured in a number of variations, including radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
pickup, estate, and two-seater roadster. Rothwell and 230 his team expended a considerable amount of time getting this element of the system absolutely spot-on, and it has paid off handsomely. To satisfy the delivery needs of high quality merchandise for individuals and enterprises engaged in online trade, china ems designs a new business which is called e-ems. This leverages the importance of a high-performance detection algorithm. The secretary told her to bring it right down 230 and she said no she was in monessen. In the existing 230 churches were organised into the convention of telugu baptist churches. In the documental archives of elciego the pipes are, with the exception of the organ in religious acts, the instrument which accounted for most payments during the 17th and 18th centuries. These types of contracts are often referred to radical for the wrong reasons

"taking back your faith from the american dream." this is the confessed purpose of david platt's new book, radical. in it, he attempts to save american christians from their cultural sins, showing that one cannot serve both the american dream and jesus christ. a decision must be made: it is either radical obedience to christ or self-centered, lukewarm mediocrity.

summary

his thesis is based upon his interpretation of the great commission in matthew 28 and a select few sayings of jesus from the gospels. simply put, he asserts that the great commission is directed towards every, individual christian; therefore, every christian—not just a select few—is obligated to go and disciple all the nations. the rest of the book is his outworking of what this looks like in practice: living modestly, caring for the poor both domestically and internationally, and centering life around the preaching of the gospel to the nations. for, he argues, god's heart is for all peoples to be saved—it has been his mission from the very beginning. therefore, it should be ours.

he concludes the book with his "radical" one-year commitment. this includes: 1) praying for the whole world, with a focus on asking god to raise up men and women to bring the gospel to the unreached people groups; 2) reading the bible all of the way through; 3) sacrificially giving to the poor and needy through the local church; 4) serving in an unfamiliar cultural context; and lastly, 5) seeking to work with a local church to bring community to those who do not have it.

review

first, platt should be praised for his cutting critique of much of american evangelicalism. he makes excellent points regarding our focus upon lavish buildings, comfort and safety, and inbred community. all of these are things the church needs to take to heart and examine how we might more wisely use the resources given to us. second, his emphasis on the importance of working within the local church is a sigh of relief. while, as will be seen, he doesn't balance this well enough and is a bit misguided in the ministry relationship between church as body and the individual as member, the centrality of the local church is a much needed antidote to the pervasive individualism today. third, his zeal for christ and for his people is humbling. while i believe it is founded upon misguided theology, it cannot be said that he is lacking for love. fourth, he articulates a very good presentation of the gospel and the sinfulness of man. he does not sugarcoat man's depravity in an attempt to appeal to his sentiments. lastly, he is powerful when speaking about the need for churches to not merely confess faith in god but to demonstrate their reliance upon the spirit through prayer and trust. he astutely rebukes many for believing in the power of their programs and strategies, leaving little room for being led by the spirit in humility. in all these areas, platt shines.

even with these hard-hitting points, i cannot recommend this book. from a literary standpoint, it is messy. topics do not flow well or build upon each other. it is monotonously anecdotal (i kept wanting to skip the stories halfway through, though i did read it in a single 2–hour period), and his grammar is at times sloppy. however, you don't need to be the greatest writer to put out a book, so this critique is only minor. if a book has sound theology and piercing application, proper grammar is not of the highest import. unfortunately, radical exhibits neither. it is needless to cover every theological issue, but the following will point out the deepest shortcomings.

first, i believe platt fundamentally misinterprets the great commission. the last command of christ to his church was to make disciples of all nations by baptizing and teaching them. as the rest of the new testament illustrates, this is the mandate of the church. the church is called to evangelize, baptize, and equip believers as god’s established institution—if the term can be used without too much anachronism. what platt fails to see is how this mandate plays out as it relates to individual christians. a careful look at the pauline epistles demonstrates the glaring absence of imperatives to evangelize, baptize, and disciple. instead, paul primarily leaves this to timothy and titus, men who are called to carry out this commission. for the rest, the emphasis is upon living their lives in a way that manifests the grace and love of christ. paul's radical call is for them to learn to love each other by encouragement, sacrifice, and thinking of each other more than themselves. they are to live in peace with the world as far as they can and orientate their lives so as to demonstrate the holiness of god in a dying world. they are to continually learn how the truth of the gospel changes everything. nowhere do we see paul commanding them to preach or evangelize the world. paul's radical view of discipleship is not for everyone to go to the ends of the earth preaching christ but to love one another and grow into maturity as the community of faith. in doing this, they will be able to support those who are called to preach to and teach the world—and indeed are commanded to do so. the making of disciples is for the community of god led by men he has called and equipped, not the obligation of every christian.

second, his use of scripture in support of his paraenetic homily (which is the best way to describe the tone and purpose of the book) is at times admirable and at others disconcerting. he takes almost every word of jesus as being directly spoken to every christian. he does the same thing by reading the history of the early church as normative for today. at one point he even states that he wishes he were back in the days of the early church. has he really read the new testament? the impetus for most of paul's letters was the numerous problems in the early church! of the galatians he was even to the point of struggling to call them saints! granted, there are principles to be learned, but one cannot read every statement in the new testament as normative and prescriptive without regard to its context and authorial intent. the most glaring case of this is in his chapter on the power of the spirit. he quotes jesus' statement about receiving the spirit upon asking as normative and perpetual. he gives no place to the redemptive–historical context of this statement—seeing as the spirit had yet to be given when jesus states this. thus, rather than understanding that the spirit already dwells in the church and thus has already empowered every saint for ministry, he interprets it to mean that we must constantly ask for the spirit whenever we are in need, and thus the spirit will come reside in us. this is a fundamental and rather dangerous understanding of the work of the spirit in the church.

third, he almost completely neglects the two-fold nature of discipling: baptizing and teaching. instead, the book focuses primarily on evangelizing, which is merely the first step in the process. i believe the reason he does this is because he cannot apply all of the commission to every christian. not every christian baptized and not every christian is gifted to teach all that jesus commanded. so he neglects baptism and the on-going training and instead focuses on what is "easier" to do: preaching the gospel. because what is so radical about serving in your local church and loving others? thus, he ends up marginalizing the commission and failing to do justice to the whole purpose of the church.

fourth, while his focus on the poor is very good and stabs at the heart of our pride and vanity, he completely neglects the new testament's priority of caring first for those of the household of faith and then those in the world. in fact, he never even mentions it in the book. we are to care for our brethren who are poor and hurting and then move outwards. this is a glaring absence in the book.

lastly, he states that unless every christian has a heart for reaching every people group, they do not have the heart of god. let's put this another way: if you do not care as much about teaching sunday school children as you do the elderly, you do not have the heart of god. this is rather short sided. god gives certain people passion for certain kinds of ministries and does not call everyone to international missions. that is what makes the church a body with many members: not everyone is a hand! we need all kinds of desires and passions to fulfill god's purpose for his people.

in all, the cultural critique of platt is good and his zeal commendable, but his misguided theology and myopic interpretation of scripture leaves his thesis falling short of something truly biblical. in fact, it lays a burden upon the christian that god himself has not given. his clarion call to care for the poor is much needed, but his failure to notice the new testament's call to care first for those of faith is entirely absent. in my opinion, his reaction to cultural sins and blind spots in the church has caused him to swing too far in the other direction, thus making radical more of an impassioned reaction to cultural weaknesses than a positive construction of biblical discipleship. it has some good points, but in the end, it fails to present a truly biblical, balanced view of what it really looks like to be a radical disciple of christ. i fear many faithful christians who read this will be disheartened and guilt-ridden for not measuring up to his radical standard. by over-generalizing and being reductionistic, platt ultimately succeeds in reducing the church to a cookie cutter formula of the most extreme fashion. the glory of the church is its diverse giftings, not its homogeneity. this is a tragedy.
as mixed contracts. Image 8: many christian denominations operated schools on reservations.

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